History of Drug Exposure as a Determinant of Drug Self-Administration

The purpose of this paper is to review how a drug’s effectiveness in initiating and maintaining self-administration can be influenced by a subject’s past experience with drugs. Drug self-administration by humans and laboratory animals is considered an instance of operant behavior (), controlled by the subject’s genetic constitution, past history, and the current circumstances of drug availability (of Skinner, 1938). The influence of history of drug exposure on current drug-maintained behavior may be controlled, in turn, by the particular drugs and doses employed and the conditions under which the drug is administered. This discussion will focus on the ways in which a history of drug exposure can control later drug self-administration in laboratory animals. Effects of history of drug exposure on initiation of drug self-administration In order to study drug self-administration by laboratory animals, an experimenter must set up a situation in which subjects are exposed to some contingency between the occurrence of a specific response and delivery of a particular drug. For many drugs, no explicit behavioral or pharmacologioal history is necessary for the drug to maintain behavior. In one initial study, for example, Read more […]