Toxicology of Antidepressant Drugs: Tricyclic Antidepressants

Animal Toxicity General Toxicology The LD 50 values for a number of tricyclic antidepressants, when administered to mice and rats in single oral or parenteral doses, are listed in Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants. Acute poisoning by tricyclic antidepressants usually leads to symptoms of central excitation followed at the higher and lethal dose levels by central inhibition. The symptomatology includes muscular weakness, twitching, stupor, respiratory disorders, ataxia, and tonic-clonic convulsions. Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants Imipramine Doxepine Nortriptyline Viloxazine Maprotiline Mouse i.v. p.o. 35 666 15- 20 148-178 26 327 60 1000 31 660- 900 Rat i.v. p.o. 22 625 13- 19 346-460 22 502 60-77 2000 38- 52 760-1050 a The values given are for LD50, single administration, in mg/kg body weight It is evident from Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants or from the reports of Pluviage () and of Ueki et al. () that no major differences in the acute toxicity of tricyclic antidepressants are apparent. Information on animal studies relating to the tolerance of tricyclic antidepressants Read more […]

Tricyclic Antidepressants: Intoxication in Man

Effects of Acute Overdose Most of the numerous publications on acute intoxication with tricyclic antidepressants deal with attempted suicide in adults or with accidental selfpoisoning in children. Taking into account the difficulty in establishing the dose ingested – particularly in the case of children and of successful suicides – it is not surprising that it is difficult to predict the severity of an acute intoxication from the dose apparently taken. In children, fatalities have occurred with doses below 500 mg and survival with doses as high as approximately 1,700 mg. In adults, doses below 1,000 mg may already prove fatal but survival has been reported with doses up to 4,000 mg or higher (). In children, the critical dose level for imipramine seems to lie around 500 mg. Of a survey comprising 34 cases, only two children who had ingested less died whereas only three with larger doses survived (). Adults, who have ingested 1,000 – 2,000 mg still have a good chance of recovery whereas the risk of a fatality becomes far greater at levels of over 2,000 mg (). In relation to body weight, an LD50 value for imipramine has been determined for children at 40 – 50 mg/kg and for adults at 30 – 50 mg/ kg (). The symptoms Read more […]

Internal Stimulus Control and Subjective Effects of Drugs

For many years psychotropic drugs have been characterized and classified using methods designed to measure their subjective effects in humans (). This research approach has two principal purposes: 1) to investigate the efficacy of a drug in attenuating unwanted subjective states in patients (e.g., pain, anxiety, depression), 2) to investigate the abuse potential of new drugs by comparing their subjective effects in experienced drug abusers to those produced by known drugs of abuse. In regard to the latter, such methods have been used to determine whether there are any common subjective states produced by all drugs of abuse (e.g., euphoria). Systematic studies of subjective methods for drug classification have been conducted at the Addiction Research Center (ARC) in Lexington, Kentucky, now part of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. A major mission of the ARC has been to evaluate new analgesic compounds to determine whether they produced morphine-like effects. The subjective effects of morphine and related compounds were an important aspect of this evaluation. The research demonstrated that morphine and related narcotic analgesics produced a unique spectrum of subjective effects that can be reliably discriminated Read more […]