Toxicology of Antidepressant Drugs

As many pharmacodynamic effects carry over from animals to man, many toxic effects may also be predicted from observations made in animals. However, some important toxic effects are not predictable from animal studies (WHO, 1966) and this limitation may apply particularly to drugs acting on the central nervous system, such as the antidepressants. Nevertheless, the recognition of species differences and similarities in responses is considered as an important means of predicting toxic effects in man. In the following, some degree of correlation is attempted by the comparison, whenever feasible, between toxicity in laboratory animals and adverse effects described in man, particularly in cases of acute intoxication. However, due to the differing amount of data that was available on various drugs and the widely varying experimental conditions employed, such a comparison may not always prove to be reliable. The following review has been restricted to antidepressants in clinical use and, as far as evidence was available from the literature, concentrated on two main categories of antidepressants, the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors and the tricyclics. The lithium salts are considered in a separate chapter of this volume. Read more […]