Cocaine: Longitudinal study of users (1975-1983)

Methods A total of 118 cocaine users were recruited for study in 1974. Of these, 19 were selected for interview and questionnaire study while 99 (85 males, 14 females) were selected for a more comprehensive longitudinal study. All 99 users (18-38 years old) were social-recreational users who met the initial requirement of having used a minimum of 1 gram of cocaine per month for 12 months (range 1-4 grams). The majority of users were students (73 percent,) while others listed their occupations as housewives, business people, writers, attorneys, physicians, secretaries, teachers, or unemployed. Exaninations and tests were performed on each subject at 6-month intervals for 4 years (1975, 1976, 1977, 1978) and then at approximately 18-month intervals for another 5 years. Examination procedures included a personal history questionnaire, drug history questionnaire, subjective drug effects questionnaire, mental status exanination, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), the Experiential World Inventory (EWI), in-depth interviews, and physical examinations (for most subjects). In addition, assays were performed on samples of cocaine used by these subjects. An important caveat is that a number of users dropped Read more […]

A Point of View Concerning Treatment Approaches with Narcotic Antagonists

When narcotic antagonists were first introduced into the treatment of drug addiction, patients were placed on the medication without regard to selection criteria and assessments of “successes” or “failures” were made only on the basis of their retention in the program. Since that time, however, our evaluation criteria have become more refined and we have begun to look at more complex questions such as: Are these compounds “helpful” and if so, “for whom” and by what treatment techniques can we augment their usefulness? A salient aspect of our naltrexone studies, for example, is addressed to the question of “for whom?” Hopefully when our data analysis is completed, it will contribute to either affirming or negating the conceptual model that we have formulated to aid us in the differential diagnosis and treatment of opiate dependent individuals. For my presentation today I have chosen to share with you some aspects of our point of view concerning treatment approaches based on our clinical experience. As investigators, we are all committed to the rigors of science with its demand for carefully controlled data. However, I am not addressing myself to specific research data, but rather to some issues concerning the application Read more […]

Studies of Acute Alcohol Effects in Women and Animal Models

Alcohol Effects on Basal Hormone Levels Another approach to examination of alcohol’s toxic effects on reproductive function is to administer a single acute dose of alcohol to a normal healthy woman or experimental animal and measure the effects on pituitary and ovarian steroid hormones. Through a systematic manipulation of alcohol dose and changes in hormone levels, it should be possible to establish whether alcohol primarily disrupts hypothalamic, pituitary, or ovarian function. Surprisingly, studies of acute alcohol administration have shown that alcohol has minimal effects on basal hormone levels. Alcohol did not significantly suppress LH or estradiol in normal women or in female macaque monkeys. These data suggest that a single episode of intoxication is probably not sufficient to suppress normal basal hormone levels and that repeated episodes of intoxication are required to produce the hormonal correlates of amenorrhea, anovulation, and luteal phase dysfunction observed in clinical studies. One procedural difficulty affecting all investigations of acute alcohol effects on basal hormone levels is that studies have usually been conducted during the early follicular or luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, when basal Read more […]

Psychotherapy and Naltrexone in Opioid Dependence

An issue of current importance to psychiatry is the efficacy of psychotherapy and phamacotherapy in comparison to one another and in combination. In addiction treatment, the importance of individual counseling for the successful use of opioid antagonists such as naltrexone has often been suggested but as yet there is insufficient data to support this contention. Furthermore, naltrexone efficacy studies have not controlled for the type or degree of patients’ involvement in interpersonal aspects of treatment. The present pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of naltrexone in conjunction with a high intervention treatment that included individual counseling as compared with a low intervention treatment that excluded such counseling. Method Sixty-six opioid-dependent volunteers were randomly assigned at intake to either a low intervention (N=31) or high intervention (N=35) treatment group. All subjects were over 18 years of age, had been addicted to opiates for at least one year, were free of serious medical and psychiatric illness and signed an informed consent. An attempt was made to match the two groups for level of opioid dependence immediately prior to entering the study and number of subjects who entered the study Read more […]

Consequences of Multiple Drug Use: Specifying the Causes

In order to illustrate these points, three specific consequences of drug use will be discussed in some detail below. These three consequences are traffic accidents, involvement in delinquent/criminal acts by youth and young adults, and emergency room visits related to drug abuse. Traffic Accidents The Monitoring-the-Future surveys contain several questions concerning traffic accidents. The seniors are first asked how many accidents (i.e., a collision involving property damage or personal injury — not bumps or scratches in parking lots) they had while they were driving in the past 12 months. If the answer is one or more, the senior is asked how many occurred after he/she was drinking alcoholic beverages and then how many occurred after he/she was smoking marijuana or hashish. By piecing together the information from these separate questions, it is possible to estimate the proportion that would be due to alcohol, to marijuana, and to alcohol and marijuana. The data in Table “Motor Vehicle Accidents and Their Connection to Use of Alcohol, Use of Marijuana, and Use of Both Alcohol and Marijuana” are for seniors in the class of 1980 classified according to the extent of alcohol and marijuana use reported during the Read more […]

The Epidemiology of Multiple Drug Use

How much multiple drug use is there? What proportion of the population at any one point in time is using/abusing multiple substances? Has use of multiple substances become more normative in the recent past as opposed to exclusive use of a favorite drug? What are the principal consequences of multiple drug use? Do these consequences differ according to pharmacological parameters for interactive potential or are there other parameters of almost equal predictive value? To what extent are the consequences attributed to single drugs (traffic accidents labeled as alcohol related) really the result of impaired judgment and performance from ingestion of multiple substances? These are just a few of the questions that need to be addressed within the scientific and public policy communities. In the following section some epidemiological data pertinent to understanding the “extent” of multiple drug use are presented. Monitoring-the-Future Studies Each year since 1975, researchers at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan have administered questionnaires to about 17,000 high school seniors attending schools randomly chosen to be representative of all high schools in the continental United States. These Read more […]

Measuring the Developmental Nature of Multiple Drug Use

There have been a number of studies in which attempts have been made to measure or assess multiple drug use. Some of these are from general populations while others are focused on specific subpopulations of users. The studies are grouped more on the basis of the approach taken to assessing multiple drug use than on the patterns uncovered. There are at least four different groupings of studies and some studies fit into more than one grouping. Developmental Patterns of Onset of Use One of the most influential attempts to describe patterns of multiple drug use is the “stages of drug use” model developed by Kandel. Kandel posited that persons proceed from licit to illicit drugs and from use of less to more serious drugs. The stages of drug use involvement that she identified were: (1) no use of any drugs; (2) use of beer or wine; (3) use of cigarettes and/or hard liquor; (4) use of marijuana; and (5) use of illicit drugs other than marijuana. Although it is not made explicit by Kandel, there is an implication that the drugs from the earlier stages of development are “carried forward” into the later stages of drug involvement. Thus, a marijuana user is likely to continue his or her use of cigarettes/hard liquor and beer Read more […]

Drug Impairment Reviews: Opiates and Minor Tranquilizers

STUDY: Gordon, N.B. Reaction Times of Methadone-Treated Heroin Addicts. Psychopharmacologia, 16:337-344. 1970. Site: Rockefeller University and Yeshiva University, New York City, New York. Subjects: The subjects were divided into six groups. Groups 1 and 3 both had been maintained for at least 1 year on methadone for the treatment of heroin addiction. Group 1 had 18 males whose average age was 32.5 years; group 3 had 9 females whose average age was 33.5 years. Group 2 consisted of 20 unpaid male volunteers who did not use drugs; they averaged 32.5 years. The participants in groups 4 and 5 had recently withdrawn from narcotic drugs. The 20 males in group 4 averaged 31.5 years and had withdrawn 14 days earlier. The 19 males in group 5 averaged 30 years and had withdrawn 4 days earlier. Group 6 consisted of 9 females whose average age was 23 years. They were paid volunteers from the nonprofessional hospital staff, and did not use drugs. Method: Measurements were taken under controlled laboratory conditions; urines were tested (details were not given) for drugs to assure conformity to group. Variations of reaction time were tested in a button-pressing situation: (a) simple reaction time (one of six stimuli); (b) Read more […]

Measurement and Extinction of Conditioned Withdrawal-Like Responses in Opiate-Dependent Patients

As O’Brien has reviewed elsewhere in this volume (), there has been much experimental work on opiates and Pavlovian conditioning processes since Wikler’s original observations of withdrawal-like responses in drug-free patients (). Several studies have found evidence of conditioned withdrawal-like and opiate-like responses in rats, monkeys, and humans (). Addict patients viewing slides or videotapes of drug-related stimuli () or handling drug objects in a preparation ritual () experience subjective craving and withdrawal-like changes in physiological measures of skin temperature, heart rate, pupillary dilation, etc. Research from our own laboratory has demonstrated that opiate withdrawallike responses in humans can be conditioned to an arbitrary conditioned stimulus (). These studies leave little doubt that conditioned withdrawal-like phenomena exist and can be both reliably elicited and measured. They do not, however, address the clinical significance of these responses. Though Wikler (1948) proposed conditioned withdrawal as the primary cause of relapse in drug-free patients, this link has not been clinically tested and is still controversial. Based on interviews with Baltimore street addicts, McAuliffe () had recently Read more […]

Cocaine abuse treatment strategies

Strategies devised to treat cocaine abuse have existed since its intractable lure for some first became obvious almost a century ago. During this period no generally accepted or successful treatment has emerged. Chronic cocaine abuse has been assumed to cause no physiologic withdrawal state on discontinuation because of insufficient evidence for an abstinence syndrome of major physiological changes like the classic sort characterizing sedative or opiate withdrawal (). Cocaine abuse has thus been assumed to be a “psychological dependence” rather than one involving neurophysiological adaptations, and currently used treatments consist of psychological strategies aimed at modifying addictive behaviors. Issues related to current psychological strategies will be discussed first, followed by a summary of evidence indicating cocaine abuse may cause neuroadaptation. The latter includes a review of pharmacological strategies, aimed at reversal of such adaptation, which may hold future potential as adjuncts in cocaine abuse treatment. Cocaine abuse treatment strategies: Current treatments Potential New Directions in Treatment Despite the past assumption that cocaine abuse is a “psychological addiction,” it is plausible Read more […]