Toxicology of Antidepressant Drugs: Tricyclic Antidepressants

Animal Toxicity General Toxicology The LD 50 values for a number of tricyclic antidepressants, when administered to mice and rats in single oral or parenteral doses, are listed in Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants. Acute poisoning by tricyclic antidepressants usually leads to symptoms of central excitation followed at the higher and lethal dose levels by central inhibition. The symptomatology includes muscular weakness, twitching, stupor, respiratory disorders, ataxia, and tonic-clonic convulsions. Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants Imipramine Doxepine Nortriptyline Viloxazine Maprotiline Mouse i.v. p.o. 35 666 15- 20 148-178 26 327 60 1000 31 660- 900 Rat i.v. p.o. 22 625 13- 19 346-460 22 502 60-77 2000 38- 52 760-1050 a The values given are for LD50, single administration, in mg/kg body weight It is evident from Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants or from the reports of Pluviage () and of Ueki et al. () that no major differences in the acute toxicity of tricyclic antidepressants are apparent. Information on animal studies relating to the tolerance of tricyclic antidepressants Read more […]

Benzodiazepines in the Treatment of Alcoholism

This post comprises three sections that cover the main aspects of benzodiazepines and alcohol: (1) the basic pharmacology of benzodiazepines; (2) use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of withdrawal; and (3) the use of benzodiazepines in treating alcoholics. The basic studies suggest that a major site of action of alcohol may be the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex and that compensatory alterations in this complex may underly withdrawal. In the section on alcohol withdrawal, interactions between the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex, sympathetic nervous system, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are discussed. Use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome are reviewed, including the possibility that the benzodiazepines may prevent withdrawal-induced “kindling”. Lastly, we review indications for, and efficacy of, benzodiazepines in long-term treatment of patients with alcoholism. Benzodiazepines are not indicated for the treatment of alcoholism. Furthermore, they have very few indications in alcoholics and their dependency-producing potency has to be appreciated when they are used in patients with alcoholism. The benzodiazepines () are a group of compounds that were first Read more […]

Nicotine-Related Disorders

Nicotine-Related Disorders Tobacco addiction is the most preventable health problem in the United States. In 1993, approximately 60 million Americans smoked tobacco, and 400,000 deaths and $50 billion in direct medical-care expenditures were attributable to tobacco (Medical-Care Expenditures Attributable to Cigarette Smoking 1994). In the United States, approximately 30% of men and 26% of women smoke cigarettes. The percentage of young adults smoking cigarettes significantly increased between 1994 (35%) and 1998 (42%) (Office of Applied Studies 1999). Since 1965, the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults in the United States has declined almost half. Cigarette smoking prevalence declined in the late 1970s, leveled off in the 1980s, and increased in the 1990s. Similar trends have occurred in other Western countries, but the prevalence of smoking has been increasing in Asia. Nicotine is a psychoactive substance with euphoric and positive reinforcement properties, similar to those of cocaine and opiates. The individual develops tolerance to nicotine and experiences significant withdrawal symptoms, including craving for tobacco, irritability, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, restlessness, decreased heart rate, Read more […]