Drug-Drug Interactions of MDMA

Alcohol The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of single doses of ecstasy 100 mg and alcohol 0.8 g/kg have been investigated in nine healthy men (mean age 23 years) in a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Each underwent four 10-hour experimental sessions, including blood sampling, with 1 week between each. For the task used to test the recognition and recording of visual information, the conditions involving ethanol yielded significantly more errors and fewer responses than ecstasy alone or placebo alone. The combination of ecstasy with ethanol reversed the subjective effect of sedation caused by alcohol alone. In addition, the combination extended the sense of euphoria caused by ecstasy to 5.25 hours. The addition of ethanol caused plasma ecstasy concentrations to rise by 13%. These results show that the combination of ecstasy with alcohol potentiates the euphoria of ecstasy and reduces perceived sedation. However, psychomotor impairment of visual processing caused by alcohol is not reversed. This is a concern for road safety, as people who take both drugs would feel sober, but their driving would still be compromised, although the extent of driving impairment Read more […]

Club Drugs and Hallucinogens

The term club drugs comes from the association of several drugs with use in dance clubs or all night dance parties (“raves”). Popular club drugs are methamphetamine (see earlier section, “Amphetamine-Related Disorders”), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD; “acid”), 3,4-methylene-dioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; “Ecstasy” or “X”), gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB; “liquid X”), ketamine (“special K”), Rohypnol (“roofies”), and dextromethorphan (“DMX”) (). Emergency department visits due to MDMA and GHB use increased dramatically starting in the late 1990s. In the United States in 2002, emergency department visits for MDMA-related disorders numbered 4,026 and for GHB-related disorders numbered 3,330. Hallucinogenic drugs include LSD, mescaline, psilocybin, and synthetic derivatives such as 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA). The popularity of hallucinogens began to wane in the mid-1970s, but a modest resurgence in use occurred in the early 1990s, particularly among youth. MDMA (“Ecstasy”) MDMA, called “Ecstasy,” was promoted in the 1960s and 1970s as a “mood drug” without the distracting perceptual changes of other hallucinogens. MDMA is usually taken orally but can be taken in-tranasally (snorted). The purity of the drug in tablets Read more […]

Drug Info: Therapeutic use. Treatment. Mental and Physiological Effects. Rehab.

Entries are arranged alphabetically and follow a standardized format that allows to easily find information, and also facilitates comparisons of different drugs. Rubrics include: • Official names, Street names: This section lists the alternate names for a substance, including brand names, generic names, and chemical names for drugs, as well as common “street” names for drugs and other substances. • Drug classification: This section lists the type of drug and its classification and schedule by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, if applicable. • Key terms: This is a mini-glossary of terms in the entry that may be unfamiliar to students. • Overview: Historical background is included here, including the drug’s origin, development, and introduction to society. The current impact of the drug is discussed. • Chemical/organic composition: This section includes discussion on the various compositions of the drug, if it is found in pure or altered forms, and whether or not it is often mixed with other substances or drugs. • Ingestion methods: Availability of the drug or substance in different forms, for example, pill or powder, is discussed. • Therapeutic use: This section describes Read more […]

Ketamine: Physiological effects

Ketamine: Composition, Therapeutic use, Usage trends. Treatment and rehabilitation. Ketamine effects. Reactions with other drugs.

Ketamine: Chemical | Organic composition

Ketamine: Composition, Therapeutic use, Usage trends. Treatment and rehabilitation. Ketamine effects. Reactions with other drugs.

Ketamine: Therapeutic use, Treatment. Ketamine rehab.

Ketamine: Composition, Therapeutic use, Usage trends. Treatment and rehabilitation. Ketamine effects. Reactions with other drugs.

Ecstasy: Reactions with other drugs or substances

Ecstasy: Composition, Therapeutic use, Usage trends. Treatment and rehabilitation. Ecstasy effects. Reactions with other drugs.

Ecstasy: Chemical | Organic composition

Ecstasy: Composition, Therapeutic use, Usage trends. Treatment and rehabilitation. Ecstasy effects. Reactions with other drugs.

Dextromethorphan: In the news

Dextromethorphan: Composition, Therapeutic use, Usage trends. Dextromethorphan effects. Treatment and rehabilitation. Reactions with other drugs.

Dextromethorphan: History notes

Dextromethorphan: Composition, Therapeutic use, Usage trends. Dextromethorphan effects. Treatment and rehabilitation. Reactions with other drugs.