The Functions of Marijuana

2016 | Comments Off

For adolescents the heavy use and abuse of all drugs involves the significance of the act of taking the drug as well as the specific functions of a particular drug for the youngster. It is reasonable to assume that any adolescent behavior strongly disapproved of by parents, teachers, and community leaders will reflect certain “antiauthority” overtones; certainly this appeared true of the representative cases of marijuana abusers. At the same time, our research indicated that past emphasis on heavy marijuana use as part of a lifestyle choice involving role modeling and affiliation with proponents of alternative social values, attitudes, and mores is unidimensional and overly simplistic. These adolescents’ involvement with drug-abusing peers waxed and waned in accordance with their changing need to smoke large amounts of marijuana. This need, while expressed in interaction with drug-abusing peers, related essentially to the psychodynamics of the youngsters’ family relationships. Defiance and provocation With someone like Dave, who grew marijuana plants in his basement, and who fought constantly with his parents over his right to smoke as much marijuana as he pleased, the provocativeness is apparent. Marijuana Read more [...]

Changing Patterns of Cocaine Use: Longitudinal Observations, Consequences, and Treatment

2016 | Comments Off

In 1858 the Austrian frigate Novara was sent to South America on a most unusual mission. The Novara was named after the city in which the Austrians had defeated the Italians, thereby stopping a threatening cultural and political renaissance. On board the Novara was a trade expert, Doctor Scherzer, who was intrigued by another Italian “renaissance” started by Milan neurolgist Paola Mantegazza. Mantegazza had published an 1857 paper proclaiming the medical importance of coca that he had chewed while a resident of Peru (Mantegazza 1857). The paper was the newest curiosity of the European medical community which even awarded Mantegazza a prize for this work in 1859 (Mortimer 1901). The Novara stopped in Peru and Scherzer took a quantity of coca leaves back to the great chemist Wohler at the University of Gottingen in Germany. Wohler’s assistant, Albert Nieman, named the isolated alkaloid “cocaine” in 1859/1860 (). The isolation and naming of the alkaloid signalled the start of 125 years of changing patterns of cocaine use. Prior to that time, only coca products were available, and the patterns of their use had not changed substantially in over 4700 years. For most of its early history, cocaine remained hidden Read more [...]

Cocaine: Short-term observations of users (1970-1983)

2016 | Comments Off

A number of studies have provided observations of contemporary patterns of cocaine use in the period 1970 to 1983. These studies have concentrated on selected populations of users that were seen at only a single point of time during this period. When reviewed chronologically, these observations suggest that patterns of cocaine use were changing rapidly throughout the period 1970 to 1983 and in particular for long-term users. For individuals engaged in continued use this change was characterized by increased dosage and frequency of use resulting in decreasing positive effects and increasing negative reactions including physical and psychological dysfunction. This changing pattern is also examined () in a series of longitudinal observations made on a sample of users studied at multiple points of time during this sane period. Users entered the 1970s with attitudes that supported their beliefs that cocaine was a "safe recreational drug." Gay and Inaba () suggested that the rediscovery of cocaine in the 1970s was inevitable because its effect of euphoria and stimulation "reinforces and boosts what we recognize as the highest aspirations of American initiative, energy, frenetic achievement, and ebullient optimism" (). Phillips Read more [...]

Cocaine: Longitudinal study of users (1975-1983)

2016 | Comments Off

Methods A total of 118 cocaine users were recruited for study in 1974. Of these, 19 were selected for interview and questionnaire study while 99 (85 males, 14 females) were selected for a more comprehensive longitudinal study. All 99 users (18-38 years old) were social-recreational users who met the initial requirement of having used a minimum of 1 gram of cocaine per month for 12 months (range 1-4 grams). The majority of users were students (73 percent,) while others listed their occupations as housewives, business people, writers, attorneys, physicians, secretaries, teachers, or unemployed. Exaninations and tests were performed on each subject at 6-month intervals for 4 years (1975, 1976, 1977, 1978) and then at approximately 18-month intervals for another 5 years. Examination procedures included a personal history questionnaire, drug history questionnaire, subjective drug effects questionnaire, mental status exanination, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), the Experiential World Inventory (EWI), in-depth interviews, and physical examinations (for most subjects). In addition, assays were performed on samples of cocaine used by these subjects. An important caveat is that a number of users dropped Read more [...]

Toxicology of Antidepressant Drugs

2015 | Comments Off

As many pharmacodynamic effects carry over from animals to man, many toxic effects may also be predicted from observations made in animals. However, some important toxic effects are not predictable from animal studies (WHO, 1966) and this limitation may apply particularly to drugs acting on the central nervous system, such as the antidepressants. Nevertheless, the recognition of species differences and similarities in responses is considered as an important means of predicting toxic effects in man. In the following, some degree of correlation is attempted by the comparison, whenever feasible, between toxicity in laboratory animals and adverse effects described in man, particularly in cases of acute intoxication. However, due to the differing amount of data that was available on various drugs and the widely varying experimental conditions employed, such a comparison may not always prove to be reliable. The following review has been restricted to antidepressants in clinical use and, as far as evidence was available from the literature, concentrated on two main categories of antidepressants, the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors and the tricyclics. The lithium salts are considered in a separate chapter of this volume. Read more [...]

Toxicology of Antidepressant Drugs: Tricyclic Antidepressants

2015 | Comments Off

Animal Toxicity General Toxicology The LD 50 values for a number of tricyclic antidepressants, when administered to mice and rats in single oral or parenteral doses, are listed in Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants. Acute poisoning by tricyclic antidepressants usually leads to symptoms of central excitation followed at the higher and lethal dose levels by central inhibition. The symptomatology includes muscular weakness, twitching, stupor, respiratory disorders, ataxia, and tonic-clonic convulsions. Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants Imipramine Doxepine Nortriptyline Viloxazine Maprotiline Mouse i.v. p.o. 35 666 15- 20 148-178 26 327 60 1000 31 660- 900 Rat i.v. p.o. 22 625 13- 19 346-460 22 502 60-77 2000 38- 52 760-1050 a The values given are for LD50, single administration, in mg/kg body weight It is evident from Table Acute LD50 valuesa of some tricyclic antidepressants or from the reports of Pluviage () and of Ueki et al. () that no major differences in the acute toxicity of tricyclic antidepressants are apparent. Information on animal studies relating to the tolerance of tricyclic antidepressants Read more [...]

Tricyclic Antidepressants: Teratology

2015 | Comments Off

Antidepressants comprise only a small portion in the vast assortment of drugs that may be taken by pregnant women. In a sample of 3,072 subjects, the number of gravid women receiving antidepressant drugs was estimated to be in the order of 0.1 % (). Similar to other drugs that are used much more frequently during pregnancy (), particularly during the first trimester (the most sensitive period of embryonal development), some antidepressants have been suspected to carry a teratogenic risk. In a short note published 1972, McBride reported on one child with amelia and mentioned two others with a similar limb deformity he felt were caused by imipramine taken by the mothers in early pregnancy. Two further cases were subsequently reported (). Doubt was, however, cast upon the validity of the McBride's notion of a causal relation between imipramine or other tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline and congenital abnormalities. The Australian Drug Evaluation Committee (1973) and the results of further clinical and epidemiologic studies failed to associate the ingestion of these drugs in early pregnancy with malformations (). Likewise, neither on account of the review presented by one manufacturer () nor on the basis Read more [...]

Tricyclic Antidepressants: Intoxication in Man

2015 | Comments Off

Effects of Acute Overdose Most of the numerous publications on acute intoxication with tricyclic antidepressants deal with attempted suicide in adults or with accidental selfpoisoning in children. Taking into account the difficulty in establishing the dose ingested - particularly in the case of children and of successful suicides - it is not surprising that it is difficult to predict the severity of an acute intoxication from the dose apparently taken. In children, fatalities have occurred with doses below 500 mg and survival with doses as high as approximately 1,700 mg. In adults, doses below 1,000 mg may already prove fatal but survival has been reported with doses up to 4,000 mg or higher (). In children, the critical dose level for imipramine seems to lie around 500 mg. Of a survey comprising 34 cases, only two children who had ingested less died whereas only three with larger doses survived (). Adults, who have ingested 1,000 - 2,000 mg still have a good chance of recovery whereas the risk of a fatality becomes far greater at levels of over 2,000 mg (). In relation to body weight, an LD50 value for imipramine has been determined for children at 40 - 50 mg/kg and for adults at 30 - 50 mg/ kg (). The symptoms Read more [...]

The Theoretical Basis of Narcotic Addiction Treatment with Narcotic Antagonists

2015 | Comments Off

The theoretical basis of narcotic addiction treatment with narcotic antagonists was well stated by Martin et al. (). Briefly, outpatient maintenance of a previously detoxified opioid addict on a daily oral opioid-blocking dose of a narcotic antagonist is expected to accomplish two objectives: (a) to remove the incentive for seeking and using opioid drugs; and (b), to extinguish conditioned abstinence (including “craving”) should this phenomenon occur as a response to environmental stimuli to which unconditioned abstinence had previously become conditioned (). Needless to add, such a period of out-patient maintenance on a narcotic antagonist should be used to “rehabilitate” the patient - i.e., to train him in the skills necessary for holding a socially useful job. to form new, mutually supportive relationships with non-drug using persons, and to persuade him to give up the illegal “hustling” activities which had become self-reinforcing during previous periods of opioid addiction. Such a period of out-patient maintenance on a narcotic antagonist would have advantages over detoxification followed by enforced abstention from opioids (by prison sentences with or without a subsequent probationary period) in Read more [...]

A Point of View Concerning Treatment Approaches with Narcotic Antagonists

2015 | Comments Off

When narcotic antagonists were first introduced into the treatment of drug addiction, patients were placed on the medication without regard to selection criteria and assessments of "successes" or "failures" were made only on the basis of their retention in the program. Since that time, however, our evaluation criteria have become more refined and we have begun to look at more complex questions such as: Are these compounds "helpful" and if so, "for whom" and by what treatment techniques can we augment their usefulness? A salient aspect of our naltrexone studies, for example, is addressed to the question of "for whom?" Hopefully when our data analysis is completed, it will contribute to either affirming or negating the conceptual model that we have formulated to aid us in the differential diagnosis and treatment of opiate dependent individuals. For my presentation today I have chosen to share with you some aspects of our point of view concerning treatment approaches based on our clinical experience. As investigators, we are all committed to the rigors of science with its demand for carefully controlled data. However, I am not addressing myself to specific research data, but rather to some issues concerning the application Read more [...]